• Users Online: 55
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home Current issue Archives Ahead of print Search Subscribe Instructions Submit article About us Editorial board Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 36  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 14-20

Cognitive decline in different delirium subtypes and the associated change in the biomarker S100B serum level


1 Neuro-Psychiatry Department, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufiya University, Menoufiya, Egypt
2 Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufiya University, Menoufiya, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Afaf Z Ragab
Lecturer of Psychiatry, Psychiatry Department, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufiya University, Shebin El-Kom, Menoufiya
Egypt
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1110-1105.153772

Rights and Permissions

Objectives This study was designed to assess the cognitive decline in different delirium subtypes and the change in the level of serum S100B, with determination of the outcome of delirium. Background Delirium involves a wide range of cognitive disturbances across its different subtypes. The serum S100B level is high in delirious patients and plays a role in the process of learning and memory. The outcome of delirium differs according to delirium subtypes. Participants and methods This study enrolled 35 delirious patients (group A) and two control groups. Group B comprised 10 patients with disease but without delirium. Group C comprised 10 normal healthy individuals. All participants were subjected to the Delirium Symptom Interview scale, the Cognitive Test for Delirium, the Delirium Motor Subtype Scale, and the Trail Making Test parts A and B, and the level of serum S100B was measured. About 17 delirious patients were followed up after 1 month to assess the cognitive decline and the mortality rate. Results The level of cognitive dysfunction in delirious patients was significantly higher than that in the two control groups (group B and group C). The level of cognitive dysfunction was not significantly different among the four delirium subtypes. Attention impairment occurred in 96% of the patients, and the less affected cognitive domain was comprehension, which occurred in 77% of the patients. The level of serum S100B was significantly higher in delirious patients compared with the two control groups, but it was not significantly different among the delirium subtypes. After 1 month, the hypoactive subtype was associated with more cognitive dysfunction and a high mortality rate. Conclusion Cognitive decline occurs in delirious patients, but this decline was not significantly different among the delirium subtypes. The most affected cognitive domain was attention and the least affected one was comprehension. Delirium was associated with a high level of serum S100B, but this level was not significantly different among the delirium subtypes. The hypoactive subtype was associated with a poor outcome.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1558    
    Printed72    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded131    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal