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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 36  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 118-123

Catechol-O-methyltransferase gene polymorphisms in Saudi cases with schizophrenia


1 Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt; Department of Psychiatry, Buraidah Mental Hospital, Al-Qassim, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Qassim University, Al-Qassim, Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Qassim University, Al-Qassim, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt
4 Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, Qassim University, Al-Qassim, Saudi Arabia
5 Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine, Qassim University, Al-Qassim, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Ashraf Tantawy
Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt; Department of Psychiatry, Buraidah Mental Hospital, Al-Qassim, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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Background This work was conducted to test for the association of genetic polymorphisms of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) with the susceptibility and clinical patterns of schizophrenia among Saudi patients. Participants and methods This is a case-control study involving 79 patients fulfilling the ICD-10 criteria of schizophrenia and 82 healthy controls. Patients were interviewed by different tools, which included the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS/V4.0), the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS), and the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (version 2.0) (WHO/DAS II). All patients and controls were screened for COMT G >A gene polymorphisms using the real-time PCR technique. Results Frequencies of all genetic variants of COMT G >A [V158M] did not show a significant difference on comparing cases with controls (P > 0.05). Comparing the frequencies of genetic variants in cases having positive parental consanguinity and a family history of schizophrenia or other mental illnesses with those without a history also showed nonsignificant results (P > 0.05). A stratified analysis related to severity scores and associated clinical illnesses also showed a nonsignificant difference (P > 0.05). Conclusion Polymorphism related to COMT G >A was not associated with the susceptibility and the severity of schizophrenia among Saudi cases.


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