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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 37  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 118-124

Functional outcome in childhood-onset schizophrenia in Nigeria: a 3-year longitudinal study


Department of Psychiatry, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Unit, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Bayero University, Kano, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Musa U Umar
Department of Psychiatry, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Unit, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Bayero University, Zaria Road, PMB 3452, 77189 UNIBAYERO NG, Kano
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1110-1105.195549

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Background The outcome of childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS) is generally regarded as poor. Few prospective studies have been reported from developing countries. Aim The aim of the present study was to assess the functional outcome in COS and the factors associated with poor outcome. Methods This 3-year prospective study included 19 patients with COS. Diagnosis was based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed., criteria using the Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia − Present and Lifetime Version; severity was assessed through the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale, whereas the measure of outcome used was Children’s Global Assessment Scale. Results The mean duration of follow-up was 39.53 (SD ±5.37) months. The mean age of onset of COS was 10.47 (SD ±0.91) years. At the end of the study, 31.6% of the participants had good outcome, 42.1% had moderate outcome, and 26.3% had poor outcome. Factors associated with poor outcome included history of perinatal complication, more negative symptoms, and longer duration of untreated psychosis. Conclusion More than a third of the sample showed good outcome over the few years of follow-up. On the basis of the findings of this study, we recommend an early intervention.


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