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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 39  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 105-108

Screening for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder among high-school graduates accepted for enrollment at Alexandria Faculty of Medicine: academic year 2016/2017


1 Department of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt
2 Department of Medical Education and Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt
3 Department of Medical Education and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt
4 Department of Medical Education, Neurology and Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt
5 Department of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria; Department of Physiology, GUC, Cairo, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Hesham Sheshtawy
Neuropsychiatry Department, El Hadra University Hospital, El Hadra, Alexandria 21525
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ejpsy.ejpsy_31_17

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Background Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a prevalent and underdetected disorder with problematic consequences. Aim of the work The aim of this study was to study the prevalence of ADHD in first-year medical students before their start of academic work. Participants and methods A comprehensive survey of all high school graduates accepted for enrollment at Alexandria Faculty of Medicine for the academic year 2016/2017 was conducted using validated Arabic version of Adult Self-Report Scale screener questionnaire. Results Response rate was ∼93% (779 students). Screening of enrolled students for ADHD using Adult Self-Report Scale showed that nearly one-fifth (21.8%) had symptoms highly suggestive and another fifth (20.3%) were borderline. No significant difference was present between males and female students regarding their scores. Positive screening was not related to sex difference, residency, or type of school. Conclusion ADHD is prevalent among first-year medical students even before starting their academic study. Positive screening was not related to sex difference, residency, or type of school. Further follow-up is needed to discover the effect of positive screening on academic achievement.


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