• Users Online: 1193
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home Current issue Archives Ahead of print Search Subscribe Instructions Submit article About us Editorial board Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 42  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 84-92

Association of angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphism and clinical characteristics in Egyptian patients with major depressive disorder


1 Department of Micobiology & Molecular Biology, Okasha Institute of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University Hospitals, Cairo, Egypt
2 Tissue Culture Lab, Medical Research Center (MRC), Okasha Institute of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University Hospitals, Cairo, Egypt
3 Department of Psychiatry, Okasha Institute of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University Hospitals, Cairo, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
MD Dalia A.M Mahmoud
Department of Psychiatry, Okasha Institute of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University Hospitals, 38 Abbasia, Nour Mosque, El-Mohamady, Al Waili, Cairo Governorate, 11657
Egypt
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ejpsy.ejpsy_49_20

Rights and Permissions

Objectives Depression is one of the leading causes of disability and suicide worldwide. It has strong genetic etiopathogenesis, especially that related to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphism. Therefore, this research tackled the relation between genetic variants of ACE polymorphism and symptomatology profile of major depression. Patients and methods A total of 42 patients diagnosed with depression matched with 39 controls underwent Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis I diagnosis clinician version, Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis I diagnosis-nonpatient edition, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, real-time PCR for genotyping, and serum cortisol level assay. Results ACE I/D gene polymorphism was significantly higher in patients with major depression (45.2%) compared with the control group (25.6%). Patients with I/D polymorphism showed longer duration of illness; greater severity; higher number of episodes and rate of hospitalization; higher tendency to be prescribed serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors and to receive electroconvulsive therapy; higher scores of core depressive symptoms, such as guilt feeling, inability to work, and suicidal ideation; and higher serum cortisol level than the other genotype groups. Conclusion Our findings support the notion that ACE I/D polymorphism affects major depression severity and symptomatology imprint.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed138    
    Printed4    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded20    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal